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Nuts

Apr
23



Eat More Package

This candy bar is one that always made me chuckle when I heard of it. Really, does one need the suggestion to eat more? Pul-eeze. I am already plenty talented in that department. A sweet friend of mine sent one to me from Canada, since that’s Eat-More’s preferred habitat.

There is little known about Eat-More’s origins. Only a little blurb on the website tells us that it’s now owned by Hershey, and that they acquired it from Nestle who bought it from Lowney. This candy bar has certainly been around the block.

The Eat-More is described as “Dark Toffee Peanut Chew”, which depending on where you are in the world can mean different things. I decided to not speculate too much ad just open the wrapper and find out for myself right away.

Firstly, Eat-More is a big, long bar. You smells the sweetness and the peanuts right away. It’s slightly sticky to handle, but it’s looks like a giant slab of darkened caramel generously studded with peanuts. I had expected it to be enrobed in chocolate from the description, but that’s not the case. The chocolate must be mixed into the toffee base, which would explain its dark color.

The flavor is pleasing. It’s main flavor is the roasted peanuts, complimented by the toffee which is sweet with subtle notes of cream and burnt sugar. The chew is soft and a tad crumbly, which I was surprised by. Thankfully though it’s not so thick that I feel my molars are in danger.

Halfway though the bar I felt quite full. I guess this is where the “Eat-More” part comes in. Do I admit defeat or continue to finish? I opted for the former, and I couldn’t help but wonder how the other half will do waiting to be eaten. It’s pretty study, so I’m sure it’ll be ok.

I still can’t help but hear in my head: “Eat more? Well, don’t mind if I do….”

Rating: Will Eat Again

 

Will Eat Again

Links Eat More Webpage


Apr
15



E.Wedel Chaewa Fruit 'n Nut

I found this bar in a Polish market. I was drawn to it because it was unusual, new, and of course Polish. I need to learn that this can mean very bad things in terms of flavor sometimes. Observing the bar, it seemed to be a log of Polish nougat. I love nougat, so into my basket it went.

Since I cannot understand Polish to save my life, I guessed that these were nougat from the photos on the wrappers. I mean, there was no translation as to what it was. Not even on the import label, which vaguely listed ingredients. I was very thankful to the artist who rendered the image on the wrapper, as it was my candy saving grace. I did drop the ball here on my role as a candy blogger, as I didn’t really research this at all. A translator could have cleared up some things for me, but I didn’t do it.

Opening the bar up I was distressed and kinda grossed out. I mean, it was greasy. Really, really, really greasy. So much so that there was actual liquid grease all over and spilled onto the table. This…. thing is wet. Sitting in a pool of greasy wetness. Ew.

I realized then that this was halvah and not nougat. Interesting.

The aroma is of nothing. A black hole has more smell than this thing. The texture was light and a little crispy on the inside. The flavor was, like the scent, non existent. It’s bland and plastic-y, and the nut and raisin bits were small and intermittent. The only lasting impression was that of the off sticky bits still stuck in my molars.

I didn’t finish this. Ick.

Rating: Inedible

 

Inedible


Mar
16



Joseph Schmidt Box

When I heard that Hershey’s would be closing down two of it’s subsidiary artisanal chocolatiers, I knew I had to make the effort to try them before it was too late. The two companies facing extinction are Scharffen Berger and Joseph Schmidt Confections, both of whom were independent until Hershey’s bought them out in 2005. The whole thing is quite sad really.

I could go on a rant on my extreme distaste of this situation, but I’ll save my breath and your time.  You can read the history of the company here at Wikipedia, who does it more succinctly than I could here.

I was lucky to find this collection of Joseph Schmidt’s truffles at Wegman’s during their big post Valentines Day sales. Since they were on sale, I figured it was a good of a time as any to give this dying breed of chocolate a taste test. I would have been tow lazy to put an order in on the website as it is, so it works out better this way.

The truffles (I’d prefer to call them bonbons, but the website refers to them as truffles, so I digress) are gorgeous to look at. The box protects each one beautifully, with each having it’s own well to sit in to keep the pieces of shuffling around. They are all unique, no two look alike. The only similarities they share are the shape: a large sound dome with a flat bottom. The tag lists the flavor, but no key saying which was which.

 

Joseph Schmidt Truffles I

All Dark: Plain looking with dark cross-crossed lines on them. It’s just a dark creamy bittersweet chocolate with nice notes of cream, caramel, raspberries and coconut.

All Milk: Milk chocolate with white lines and dots on top. The milk chocolate is awesome: sweet, creamy, with nice notes of caramel, coffee. The ganache echoes the flavors to the shell, but is much milder and creamier. Loved this one, so delicious in its simplicity.

Champagne: Milk chocolate with a creamy colored spot on the very top. It immediately has an sweet, alcoholic flavor to it: tasting lightly of grapes and strawberries that mixes in with the smooth milk chocolate ganache. Something about the flavor reminds me of chocolate ice cream.

Sea Salt Caramel: Dark chocolate with a little hollow in the very top filled with salt crystals. The inside tastes more fruity than of caramel. It’s very rich and interestingly has plum notes to it.

Wild Strawberry: Milk chocolate with a pink dot on top. The flavor is immediately fruity and jam-like. It’s very sweet yet has a nice tart edge to it.

Dark Raspberry: Plain with multiple white lines crossing at the top. The ganache has a wonderfully tart, strawberry jam flavor to it. It’s really more tart than sweet and it really overpowers the chocolate. I’m surprised at the tartness of it. It’s very flavorful ad juicy and pairs well with the chocolate shell.

Hazelnut: The easiest of them all to distinguish: milk chocolate with a raw hazelnut plopped on top and drizzled with lines of chocolate. The milk chocolate is smooth, creamy and sweet. The ganache has a nutty, almost alcoholic flavor. I expected something more like Nutella, but it’s so far from it. It’s more roasted nut flavors and cream, like a hazelnut coffee.

Grand Marnier(r): The shell is dark chocolate with the design of a white chocolate X on top. The dark chocolate is deep, rich and sweet. The ganache center is smooth and creamy, and I get a nice, mellow orange flavor to it. No hint of alcohol of all.

Irish Cream: Mottled with white chocolate and darker chocolate flecks on top, so it reminded me of a bird’s egg. Quite pretty. The ganache inside is perfectly smooth and carried the Irish Cream flavor slightly. It doesn’t has a slight alcoholic burn to it, and that nice, lightly coffee boozy flavor I associate with Bailey’s. Lovely, really nicely balanced with the flavors of the smooth chocolate.

Tiramisu: Milk chocolate with white chocolate and dark chocolate lines and dots. This one I couldn’t tell if it was meant to be tiramisu or champagne, but this had a tinge more coffee flavor to it, so I decided it must be the former. You taste the alcohol with this fruity bitterness and a hint of coffee. It pairs beautifully with the dark chocolate ganache and the milk chocolate shell.

Double Latte: Beautiful white chocolate shell with a large milk chocolate spot on top. Smells extremely milky. The flavor is strong of coffee with the ganache tasting of a smooth, creamy, medium-bodied roast. So fresh and terribly flavorful.

Pomegranate: This one is creamy and milky looking on top, like cream just poured into coffee. The milk chocolate shell is hard with a nice creamy, sweet flavor. The ganache is smooth and chocolatey, and has a nice, lightly tart red fruity flavor to it. It’s hard to really identify pomegranate as an iconic flavor, but this does read a fruity and exotic, so I think the essence here is nicely captured.

Even though this is a Valentines Day box, you can find the same flavors in the Easter assortments. The 30th of June will be the last day of sales, with Easter being their last season. If my descriptions enticed you in the least, I recommend giving them a try before they disappear forever.

Rating: Will Buy Again

 

Will Buy Again

Links Joseph Schmidt Website

 


Mar
09



Terrys Chocolate Orange: Snowball

After yesterday’s explanation about the Terry Chocolate Orange, you’re probably wondering why t is I’m eating another one. It’s simple: I was given this one along with the Cracking Hazelnut. I had to try both! Especially since I’m a sucker for white chocolate. The idea of getting that orange flavor blended with the white chocolate made me swoon on the inside, so I was particularly excited about giving this one a go.

I can’t help but wonder if this one is a very limited, limited edition. The fact that they call it a “Snowball” sets off alarms in my head.

So we’re all familiar with the process: remove from box, WHACK, unwrap and eat.

This Terry’s Orange is beautiful to look at. Unlike the milk and dark chocolate varieties, the mold of the orange looks so much better in the white. The ivory slices just reach a new aesthetic level to me. They smell sweet and slightly of orange. I’m happy to report that neither are overpowering.

The flavor is creamy, sweet, and milky like a good standard white chocolate. The orange flavor is at the forefront with very juicy, citrus and zesty notes. The two flavors blend well with the sweet white chocolate allowing the orange flavor to really shine.  In some of the other Terry Oranges the orange flavor comes across as a tad artificial, but it doesn’t do that here.

I wish I could get this one again easily. It’s the perfect version of a Terry’s Orange for me. Sadly, it’s all eaten up, and I’m sure it’s no longer sold. Best to not look back. *sob*

Rating: Will Buy Again

 

Will Buy Again

Links Links US Terry’s Chocolate Orange Page


Mar
06



Terrys Chocolate Orange: Cracking Hazelnut

The Terry’s Chocolate Orange has always been a staple in my household, especially around the holidays. It’s unheard of not to have one stuffed in their Christmas stocking, or you risk running a family riot. That being said, I never paid too much attention to them. I don’t know if it’s because of the hullabaloo that my sisters make about them, or how they taste to me, but I was always very passive about them. Sure, they were fun to whack and unwrap, and pretend you lived in Willy Wonka’s factory where all fruits were made of chocolate. But, the fact remains that I found them unremarkable. I feel alone in this, since my family doesn’t understand and I get phone calls from friends asking their candy expert friends on where to find them in stores.

Now, you’re probably wondering why I’m reviewing one after such a lament. Well, this isn’t your standard Terry’s Chocolate Orange. Oh no, this is a special limited edition one from the UK. Knowing my insatiable appetite for the latest and greatest in the candy world, how could I resist? Obviously I couldn’t. Besides, maybe this new twist is all I need to turn my apathy into passion for the Terry Chocolate Orange.

Only one way to find out.

I eagerly removed the Orange from it’s box….

WHACK!

I scurried to get the foil wrapper peeled away as fast as I could so I could inhale this new, exotic chocolate fruit. Hmmm, it smells like Nutella!

It has a slight, Nutella-like flavor. The chocolate is milky, sweet and very creamy in texture. The hazelnuts are a little chunks in the chocolate and they give an interesting texture and a strong nutty flavor. The orange is milder here than the other Terry Oranges, as it’s cut down by the hazelnut flavor. I’m pleased to report that it’s really much more complex to taste! The texture is a nice contrast of the smooth chocolate and the crisp, crunchy texture of the small hazelnut bits. 

I’m pleased with this. It’s not enough to make me go out and stockpile, but at least now I get a glimpse of why this chocolate is loved so much by many. I’d eat this again if it was put in my Christmas stocking.

Rating: Will Eat Again

 

Will Eat Again

Links US Terry’s Chocolate Orange Page


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